A Guide for Developing and Enhancing Community Oral Health Programs  
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Appendix D. Comparison of Five Effective Community Prevention Programs for Dental Caries
 
Program
Effectiveness (%)
Adult Benefits
Cost per Year
Practicality

Community fluoridation

20–40

 Demonstrated 50.51 per capita
50.72 per capita
Excellent, most practical; no individual effort necessary
School fluoridation
20–30§
Expected but not demonstrated $0.85–$9.88 per child
$1.19–$13.83 per child
Good; if there is no central community water supply, no individual effort necessary
School dietary fluoride
30
Expected but not demonstrated $0.81–$5.40 per child‡¥
$1.13–$7.56 per child
Fair, continued school regimen;
daily supplement program required for children ages 8–10
School fluoride mouth rinse program
25–28§
Not expected $0.52–$1.78 per child‡¥
$0.73–$2.49 per child
Fair, continued daily or weekly school regimen required
School sealant program
51–67
Expected but not demonstrated $13.07–$28.37 per child
$18.30–$39.72 per child
Good; primarily done for children ages 6–8 and 12–14

*This table is a simplified comparison of these prevention programs. A thorough analysis of the literature should be undertaken to understand the relative merits of these programs.

   In 1999 dollars.
   ‡ In 1989 dollars.
  § This range may now be high; no recent studies are available.
  ¥ Includes use of volunteer personnel.
   ¶ First molar chewing surfaces only over 5-year period.


Source: Allukian Jr. M. 2003. Oral disease: The neglected epidemic. In Scutchfield FF, Keck, CW, eds., Principles of Public Health Practice (2nd ed.). Albany, NY: Delmar Publishers.

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Table of Contents Appendices AACDP References Home Appendices References Conclusion Step 6 Step 5 Step 4 Step 3 Step 2 Executive Summary Overview Step 1 Acknowledgements